Child Custody & Visitation

Ohio Child Custody Law Firm

Parma and Richmond Heights Child Visitation Lawyer

Child custody is often one of the most important and most contentious parts of a divorce or separation. Even after the divorce agreement is signed, people often want to make modifications, which can result in further controversies. People faced with child custody and visitation matters need both strong, experienced representation and a lawyer who will carefully and compassionately guide them through the process.

In the past 30 years, the attorneys of Russo, Rosalina & Co., LPA have helped thousands of people in the Cleveland area get through difficult divorce, child custody, and visitation issues. We are a family law firm in more ways than one -- we handle all kinds of family law issues, and our firm consists of a father, daughter, and son-in-law, all of whom are lawyers. Contact us and we will create a comfortable environment in which to get your matters settled.

Initial Custody and Visitation Arrangements

When setting up custody and visitation agreements, it is important to know the basics of Ohio child custody laws. There are two basic types of custody:

  • Legal custody gives the right to make decisions on the child's behalf, including everything from religion and education to discipline.
  • Physical custody is what people often think of as custody -- it involves where the child lives.

Typically, one parent either gets sole custody, which is both legal and physical custody of a child, or two parents share both legal and physical custody in a joint custody arrangement. Our lawyers can make an ideal arrangement for you by using these basic structures along with the laws concerning father's visitation rights in Ohio, child custody for unwed parents in Ohio, or whatever else is pertinent to your case.

Modifications to Existing Arrangements

Custody arrangements can be legally modified for many reasons. If, for example, the parent with custody (the "custodial parent") exposes the child to dangerous situations, the other parent (the "non-custodial parent") may argue that a modification is justified in order to protect the child. Modifications can also be made simply because both sides agree that changes should be made.

Contact Us

Contact our Ohio child custody attorneys to get our help in your custody or visitation matter. We respond to all requests quickly, and keep all matters strictly confidential.